Storytelling By Little Authors

We are remarkable in many ways.

We are all remarkable narrators. From the very moment we start making sense of our surroundings a narrative is born. Our experiences take shape in the form of the observations we make, the environments we are in, the encounters and events we participate and the influences we absorve, let them be directly or indirectly, they make up for a grand narrative.

When you have fairy tale eyes, the world is full of wonder.

— Viktor Blüthgen

In a way, what are we without a story? We all have one and we all are surrounded by infinite ones.

Storytelling is thus a constant and a present act of communication and the sharing of thoughts, ideas, experiences, knowledge and so forth, independent of how crazy or far-fetched they might be. Storytelling is simply the magical ticket to a world of endless possibilities.

Every moment has a special message.

— Hazrat Inayat Khan

The beauty of storytelling.

Little ones embrace storytelling naturally and it is mostly their favorite form of communication. Their narratives are driven by the enriching world of endless possibilities. They easily and unassumingly connect and blend the dots of both worlds simultaneously, embellishing the ones based on their personal and direct experiences with the ones based on a magical world of their own.

The beauty of storytelling by little ones is that it knows no boundaries, there is always a touch of fascination and it is accompanied by genuine emotional attachment. Furthermore, there is always a message to it, we simply have to reminiscence of those days where once upon a time, magic was everywhere and everything made sense regardless.

There are absolutely no rules of architecture for a castle in the clouds and this is real.

— Gilbert K. Chesterton


The Power Of Stories Written By And For Young Minds

Children’s minds are wondrous places, filled with fantastic creatures, imagined worlds, and limitless possibilities.

They’re deep wells of creativity, with the potential to spin amazing stories that tickle, delight, inspire, inform, excite, and so much more. And these stories deserve to be written, enjoyed, and shared — especially with other young minds.

Why? As the proud parents of a little author ourselves, we can think of a few reasons.

Give me a reason to not conquer the world.

— Fauzia Haun

Children of the same age share a special bond — and so do their stories

Children inhabit a different world than grown-ups. From adult-sized objects and environments to big moods and feelings, everything seems larger and more up-close when you’re a small human.

That’s why stories written by children strike a special note. They reflect the world as children see it. They speak in a voice and language that children innately understand. They tell innocent, intuitive truths about childhood, as only children can, before the world (with all its biases) shapes their perspectives.

What’s more, these kinds of stories have the potential to connect children from different countries and cultures around the world. They weave a global web and get children from all kinds of backgrounds seeing, thinking, and feeling in new ways.

Today you are you! That is truer than true!

There is no one alive who is you-er than you!

— Dr. Seuss

Stories inspire young minds to explore, create, and achieve

We teach children to think about what they want to be “when they grow up.” But what about now? After all, imagination, creativity, and achievement aren’t just for adults — they’re for everyone!

One way to spark our little ones’ creativity and encourage them to dream big is by reading, sharing, and recognising the stories of other children. When children see that people of their age can write their own books and get them published, it shows them that their thoughts matter — and can take them anywhere. And it might just inspire them to stretch the limits of their own ambitions and get them putting their own ideas to paper.

The Smile You Send Out, It Returns To You.

— Indian Proverb

Some of the most powerful learning happens through reading and writing

Little Red Riding Hood. The Three Bears. Jack and the Beanstalk. There’s a reason we have so many stories for children and why they stay with us throughout our lives. It’s because storytelling is one of the most powerful ways we learn, remember, and grow.

By giving children the chance to weave their own stories, we help them learn foundational concepts, like plot, character, cause and effect, and good and bad. But that’s not all. We also foster their imaginations and unlock the potential for a new generation of stories that will leave a lasting impact for readers now and in the future.

Stories encourage lifelong thinking, learning, and growing.

What happens in childhood influences little ones’ habits, routines, and preferences for a lifetime. So the best time to develop a lifelong love of the written word is when they’re young.

So let’s encourage our children’s minds to roam far and wide! We can expand their horizons and keep the magic of childhood with them through the years, with stories written by them and for them.


Helpful Travel Tips and Tricks for your Next Big Adventure

Many years ago, I worked for my parents who own a video production company. Because it is a family business, you inevitably end up wearing many hats and being the czar of many different jobs. I mainly managed projects and worked as a video editor. On production, there were times that I was called on to work as an audio tech and was made to wear headphones on long production days. In those days, having a really good set of headphones that picked up every nuance of sound was essential to making sure the client got what they needed. Naturally, my first impression of these headphones is based off of the look of them. They have a classic over-the-ear style that is highlighted by a blue light that indicates the power for the noise canceling. The padding on the ear pieces seems adequate for extended usage periods.

They are wired headphones, but the stereo mini-plug cable is detachable. Something else I noticed right of the bat was the very nice carrying case that comes with them. It has a hard plastic exterior with a soft cloth interior that helps to protect the surface of the headphones from scratches. I never truly appreciated cases for headphones until I started carrying them from place-to-place. Now I can’t imagine not having a case. Once I gave the headphones a thorough once-over exam, I tried them on. As I mentioned, they have a classic over-the-ear style and just looking at them, the padding on the ear pieces seem adequate and the peak of the headband seemed to be a bit lacking, but you don’t really know comfort unless you try on the product. So, I slipped the headphones on and found them to be exquisitely comfortable.

If you look at what you have in life, you'll always have more. If you look at what you don't have in life, you'll never have enough.
Oprah Winfrey

Now that I had the headphones on my head, I was finally ready to plug and play some music. I plugged the provided cable into the jack on the headphones and then the one on my iPhone. Then I called up Pandora. I tend to have a very eclectic music purview and have many stations set up for different moods. the sound quality of these headphones was remarkable. There is an amazing depth of sound and incredible highs and lows that make listening to music a truly breathtaking experience. In order to test how voices sounded, and the overall art of mixing, I pulled up Netflix on my iPad Air and watched a few minutes of a movie to hear all the nuances of the film.

None of them were lost. In fact, I ended up hearing sounds that I hadn’t heard before. Echoes…birds chirping…wind blowing through trees…breathing of the characters…it was very impressive what the headphones ended up bringing out for me.


The Power of Stories Written By and For Young Minds

In ArtsAugust 25, 20221 Minutes

Fauzia Haun

We are all remarkable narrators. From the very moment we start making sense of our surroundings a narrative is born. Our experiences take shape in the form of the observations we make, the environmentswe are in, the encountersand events we participate and the influences we absorve, let them be directly or indirectly, they make up for a grand narrative.

In a way, what are we without a story? We all have one and weallaresurrounded by infinite ones.

Storytelling is thus a constant and a present act of communicationand the sharingof thoughts, ideas, experiences, knowledge and so forth, independent of how crazy or far-fetched they might be. Storytellingis simply the magical ticket for a world of endless possibilities.

Little onesembracestorytelling naturallyand it is mostly their favorite form of communication. Their narratives are driven by the enriching world of endless possibilities. They easily and unassumingly connect and blend the dots of both worldssimultaneously, embellishing the ones based ontheir personal and direct experiences with the ones based on a magical world of their own.

The beauty of storytelling by little ones is that it knowsno boundaries, there is always a touch of fascination andit is accompanied by genuine emotional attachment. Furthermore, there is alwaysa message to it, we simply have to reminiscence of those days whereonce upon a time,magic was everywhere and everything made sense regardless.


Everyday inspired by the Beauty of the Mountains

In ArtsAugust 22, 20228 Minutes

Fauzia Haun

Take your time.

I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It runs about $1300. It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms. The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger.

When it dies, swap them all.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.

Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, my sunset sky.

— Rabindranath Tagore

Breathe the world.

I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms. The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger. When it dies, swap them all.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.

Heavy hearts, like heavy clouds in the sky, are best relieved by the letting of a little water.

— Christopher Morley

Enjoy the morning.

The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger. When it dies, swap them all.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.

It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms.

There are absolutely no rules of architecture for a castle in the clouds and this is real.

— Gilbert K. Chesterton

Free your mind.

The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger. When it dies, swap them all.

I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.


My Free Time Habit and Why You Should Have One Too

Just the other day I happened to wake up early. That is unusual for an engineering student. After a long time I could witness the sunrise. I could feel the sun rays falling on my body. Usual morning is followed by hustle to make it to college on time. This morning was just another morning yet seemed different.

Witnessing calm and quiet atmosphere, clear and fresh air seemed like a miracle to me. I wanted this time to last longer since I was not sure if I would be able to witness it again, knowing my habit of succumbing to schedule. There was this unusual serenity that comforted my mind. It dawned on me, how distant I had been from nature. Standing near the compound’s gate, feeling the moistness that the air carried, I thought about my life so far.

Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people's thinking.
Steve Jobs

I was good at academics, so decisions of my life had been pretty simple and straight. Being pretty confident I would make it to the best junior college of my town in the first round itself, never made me consider any other option. I loved psychology since childhood, but engineering was the safest option. Being born in a middle class family, thinking of risking your career to make it to medical field was not sane. I grew up hearing ‘Only doctor’s children can afford that field’ and finally ended up believing it. No one around me believed in taking risks. Everyone worshiped security. I grew up doing the same.

‘Being in the top will only grant you a good life’ has been the mantra of my life. But at times, I wish I was an average student. I wish decisions would have not been so straightforward. Maybe I would have played cricket- the only thing I feel passionate about. Or maybe I would have studied literature (literature drives me crazy). Isn’t that disappointing- me wishing to be bad at academics. It’s like at times I hate myself for the stuff I am good at.

When you step out of these four walls on a peaceful morning, you realize how much nature has to offer to you. Its boundless. Your thoughts, worries, deadlines won’t resonate here. Everything will flow away along with the wind. And you will realize every answer you had been looking for, was always known to you. It would mean a lot to me if you recommend this article and help me improve.